Nikon D7200 Review

Finding a versatile camera that handles all degrees of lighting and still provides quality images is a perennial challenge for photographers at every stage of development. This ever-growing market has paved incredible grounds with new styles like full frame options, mirrorless bodies, and tech savvy innovations.

Today we are exploring the exceptional Nikon D7200 and pitting it against other DSLR cameras of exceptional quality and low light condition abilities. These low light abilities, in particular, are evaluated not just on the camera’s ISO range, but also with careful regard to the quality of those images as we test harsher and harsher ISO settings. Today we highlight this incredible addition to the Nikon family for photographers interested in a prosumer grade camera capable of capturing images at pristine quality without pressuring you into an otherwise very expensive camera body.

What Is the Nikon D7200?

The Nikon D7200 is a DSLR camera with an APS-C sensor that definitely stretches the limits of the genre. It maintains the qualities iconic to the Nikon brand while applying exciting new ergonomic and technical upgrades that make lovers of the brand happy.

Product Specs

The Nikon D7200 is a DX-format DSLR with a 1.5x crop factor on a 24 MP CMOS sensor (without an optical low-pass filter). It can fire off 5 frames per second while in 14-bit RAW and 6 frames per second continuous shooting in 12-bit RAW or JPEG. Images can span 13.5 MP to 14-bit RAW depending on your shooting speed, and the buffer manages 13-22 shots in 14-bit lossless.

Other exciting advances feature the new Multi-CAM 3500 DX II AF system which uses TTL phase detection and 51 points of 15 cross-type sensors to provide focus capabilities on even f/8 lenses. The massive ISO range spans 100–25,600 in full color but can even be boosted to 51,200-102,400 in black and white mode.

Other cool features are the twin SD card slots with SD, SDHC, and SDXC memory card compatibility so you can either back up your images as jpegs or hold extra space for more shots.

If you are interested in shooting footage, the full 1080p HD video recording mode can shoot at up to 30p and up to 60fps. This is primarily a photographic camera, though, and the resulting features continue to be supportive of that primary function. It has a built-in 9999 shot in camera time lapse that even includes exposure smoothing so there is no need to purchase intervalometers and other items.

The body type is a magnesium-alloy with exceptional weather/moisture and dust seals and a 150,000 cycle-rated shutter system. Finally, the LCD is a 3.2 inch, 1,229K-dot LCD monitor, so reviewing images is completely clear and accurate. As an added bonus, the camera includes a built-in Wi-Fi with NFC. Without a doubt, this is a camera any photographer would be proud to own.

Pricing

Be ready to start with about $1,000 for just the body only on this product. In addition, you’ll want quality lenses to support it that can often start at another $1,000 and increase in price from there. Meanwhile, if you are just starting, expect to drop even more money on purchsings support gear like lights, tripods, monopods, batteries, and carrying gear.

How It Compares

To give you a completely full view of how this camera performs as well as what available options you have on the market, our review also includes a list of similarly competitive cameras that might just give the Nikon D7200 a run for its money. These cameras are the following:

Sony a6300

Canon 7D Mark II

Olympus OM-D E-M5 Mark II

Nikon D7200

Nikon D7200 Review

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  • Ease of Use
  • Performance
  • Design Quality
  • Warranty

Nikon users will surely find familiarity and ease of use in this camera but if you are otherwise coming to Nikon from a different camera background, expect a bit of a learning curve.

This camera handles sharpness and image quality like a boss. It is an exceptional piece of technology and really does maximize the power of its otherwise smaller sensor. More expensive cameras will gather better images but the cost of diminishing returns might suggest that those finer details may not be worth it unless you are really deep in the photography field.

The Nikon D7200 has certainly made advancements that are largely improvements on the previous iterations of this camera. Its navigable button setup and continuing dedication to ergonomic continues to endow this camera with a design that stands to be a strong addition to the burgeoning field of digital photography.

You can find 3 and 4 year warranty plans for between $52 and $58, respectively.

PROS

  • Reasonable camera body price
  • Premium camera power
  • Built In time lapse

CONS

  • Exceptional quality sensor means less than premium lenses are not great for shooting with
  • Not much of an update from the Nikon D7100
  • Is great at many things but a master of none

Sony a6500

Nikon D7200 Review

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The Sony a6500 is a mirrorless DSLR camera that offers quality photo versatility alongside exceptional video capabilities inside a compact, thin, and efficient camera body. As a competitor to the Nikon D7200, it offers quality handling in low light. As a prosumer grade camera, it is largely revered amongst Sony’s continuing achievements in camera production. With a maximum 51,200 and otherwise usable photos at 25,600 ISO, you can confidently approach any shooting scenario without fear of under exposure. It has a 25MP APS-C sensor capable of shooting quality photos as well as video with a fidelity of up to 4K. It has additional video shooting capacity for full HD 1080 at up to 120 frames per second.

  • Ease of Use
  • Performance
  • Design Quality
  • Warranty

With most of its features buried in menus and internal settings, tracking down items you need can be challenging and for that, we have deducted points on the Sony a6500 for ease of use.

Sony holds its position with this camera as a low light master and without a doubt makes it a fun piece of equipment to shoot on in every degree of lighting.

This camera has made nearly no changes to its physical design since previous iterations. Its thin design is sometimes critiqued for providing no counterweight to the often heavy lenses that are incumbent of so many professional cameras.

You can find 3 and 4 years plans for between $52 and $58, respectively.

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PROS

  • 4k video shooting
  • 425-point phase-detect AF
  • 5-axis body-based image stabilization
  • ISO 100-25,600 (exp. to 51,200)

CONS

  • More expensive than some cameras with a full frame sensor quality
  • Small body size
  • Digital focus means physical design is lacking

Canon 7D Mark II

Nikon D7200 Review

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Considered one of the best crop frame cameras for low light available on the market, the Canon 7D Mark II offers similar physical dimensions to the Nikon D7200 in profile and weight while catering its design and abilities to the preferences to Canon users. It can shoot 1080p video on its massive 20.2MP APS-C sensor and can output images as both raw and jpeg options. The built-in GPS will help you to better keep track of your photos and the weather sealed body will ensure that your camera will handle even the toughest conditions that you throw at it. Overall, this is Canon’s design for a similarly competitive low light camera and it for sure does not disappoint users in that regard.

  • Ease of Use
  • Performance
  • Design Quality
  • Warranty

If you are a Canon user, this camera should be fairly familiar to you and should be a pleasure to shoot with. However, you should assume there will be a learning curve if you otherwise have no background in shooting with this model.

Many note that this camera is great to shoot with but poses occasional problems with the interface and settings. Basically, it captures exceptional images but it may occasionally be challenging to capture images at all.

This camera’s two card slot is supportive of flash and SD cards. Its exterior functions mean you can tailor the power of this camera to your needs or otherwise pick it up confidently straight out of the box.

You can find warranties for the Canon 7D Mark II at $58 and $68 for 3 and 4 years.

PROS

  • Can handle moderately high ISOs and still produce quality images
  • SD and compact flash card accessible
  • Built-in GPS

CONS

  • Expensive and still not a full frame camera
  • Autofocus has trouble with other lenses
  • Doesn’t handle low light and other full frame cameras available

Olympus OM-D E-M5 Mark II

Nikon D7200 Review

?via amazon

Olympus makes its own case for low light capability and power against the Nikon D7200 with its Olympus OM-D E-M5 Mark II. This stylish camera body packs a low light punch in a small, portable frame. The 16.1 MP sensor manages ISOs up to 25,600 which means quality shooting in both daytime and nighttime settings. Meanwhile, its 81 autofocus points, built-in Wi-Fi, and sensor shift 5-way image stabilization make this camera a new user-friendly option for every degree of interest and ability in this camera. It is worth noting that this camera operates on a micro four-thirds sensor, which means it is not the biggest sensor on our list and does in turn suffer quality loss as compared to other contenders on our list.

  • Ease of Use
  • Performance
  • Design Quality
  • Warranty

Canon and Nikon users typically outweigh Olympus users and to that end, picking up this camera might pose a bit of a challenge for new users to incorporate their specific model.

A nighttime powerhouse with sensitivity for the finer things in daylight shooting, the Olympus is a great camera to start shooting with.

For an exceptional combination of both looks and power, this camera definitely stands out for design when compared to other options available on this list.

Between $51 and $57 will get you a warranty that will hold strong for this camera model.

PROS

  • Stylish body design
  • Relatively small camera body
  • Powerful in low light scenarios

CONS

  • Unique mount may not be accessible to many lenses without an adapter
  • Smaller micro four-thirds sensor
  • Video mode is not very strong

Conclusion

Our final verdict on the Nikon D7200 as it compares to similar cameras on the market is it is a superb, mid-range camera for users who need a camera body that tactfully handles low light and odd lighting scenarios with tact, power, and quality. It may night be as powerful as other full frame sensor cameras on the market, as portable as mirrorless contenders, nor as stylish as other classic body designs, but as an all-around powerhouse, Nikon D72000 will make you proud of your purchase for years to come.

Meanwhile, with a heavy interest in comprehensive internal abilities like time-lapse technology, it is a camera that is even more fun and powerful to play with. As with every camera choice, the choice is always contingent on what your specific needs entail, but for a camera that appeals to the greatest common denominator, the Nikon D7200 will likely not disappoint.

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